Stowaway

on 16 February 2006 at about 16:38

Web 2.0 is the new Marxism

This item was originally posted on CEMP's Interactive Media Portal on 16 February, 2006.

World goes to Gulag hell in an AJAX-skin handbag.

No it isn’t April 1st. CBS has a story today about The Communist Web in which the author is pretty contemptuous of ideas like self-realisation (that’s just ‘narcissism’), and argues that democratisation of media only leads to the ‘flat noise of opinion’. The destruction of elite media structures will, apparently, mean nothing of any quality ever being made again.

Lawrence Lessig, then, must be the new Stalin?

Via The Read/Write Web

[Original] Comments

Quality won’t disapear it will just be harder to find, any way who defines quality? It could be argued that without the need to generate revenue for greedy shareholders, the quality of media might improve.. the elite media structures produce some of the lowest quality (in my perception of the term)programming in the media sphere today.

The web 2.0 and the whole debate that surrounds this fictional and very clever rebranding, reminds me of a very similar debate that surrounded the invention of the printing press, although there was no instance reaction to the introduction of the printed over time it resulted in social reform as the population gradually moved away from pre-print ( late middle age social / economical)structures of thought, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau Bentram and Kant among others lead the social reform, and the idea of the social contract or agreement was formed.

At present, I can’t help but feel that we as society today (feel free to disagree) are at the same cross roads, trying to apply current ethics and social moral and ecnomical systems to the web, indeed they may act as an band aid while we work out future paths, it would seem in the long run, new systems will have to be developed,debated and adopted a process which started in the late 80’s and continues today.

I feel at present to use a cliche term i’m part of “Digital Society Beta” as I sit here in a transitional stage between the old and next level of social reform.

Sorry went a bit of subject there..

question: is the term web 2.0 just a clever rebranding of an evolving medium can we really label the web in version numbers?

Quite Amusing

http://web2.0validator.com/

CEMP btw scored 2 out of 44..

Yes I have to much time on my hands.

When I ran this site it scored 4 out of 44. Do we see this as a good thing? :-P

I think you’re right that there are parallels with the invention of the printing press, though the kind of time-scales we’re talking here are worlds apart.

Martin Luther used the printing press to directly challenge the authority of the Catholic Church, who were at the time in a position to monopolise written discourse and access to education. The revolution (poor word since it implies it happened quickly) that the printing press brought about certainly drove the increasing literacy of the general population, though even to this day, the number of people who get to be producers of written discourse (ie authors in print) is tiny, and controlled by the publishing industry.

Now, with the web, it is easy for us to say this this is once again revolutionising access to written discourse, and technologies that get described as web2.0 are certainly contributing to that in a real way, notwithstanding the general hype surrounding the term.

However, we can’t overlook the fact that many people are still ‘consumers’ of discourse in the public domain, rather than ‘producers’. So for all that we say that something like flickr is enabling the ‘ordinary people’ to be producers of discourse, the actual overwhelming demographic of people contributing to the web2.0 ‘noise of opinion’ are still a fairly elite, techno-literate, affluent section of the world’s population (and possibly they have too much time on their hands).

And also, how do most people really spend their time on the internet? Looking at jokes and amusing videos? Although the web allows me to read the viewpoint of a women living in Iraq, and therefore subvert the traditional news gatekeepers, how many internet users do the same? Or even want to?

That said, Pew Internet’s study of teenagers last December said that about half of them had ‘produced’ content for the web, whether it’s just contributing to a forum, writing a blog or sharing images.

In light of that, I’d say Andrew Keen (author of CBS’s piece above), is right to hold his bowels in anticipation of his kind being swept out of their dominant positions. But does he really think that a contemporary talent equivalent to Hitchcock wouldn’t find an audience?

In answer to Andrew’s question, I think that the term is getting a lot of hype – but it does point at something real. Over the last two or three years, there has been a real movement to cause what we would normally call websites (ie authored by one person or group) to become heteroglossic (aggregating distributed content). It’s just that that aggregated content doesn’t always represent a large variety of social voices. I mean, _I_read Global Voices, but I’m a white, middle-class, well-educated, university-lecturer, theory-specialist with a professional interest in the variety of voices on the web. My kid brother prefers to hang out in game forums and my sister chats in myspace (and all power to them) and think my internet stuff is boring :)

Several RRS feeds reported today that DVDs now outsell music and video games. And I’ll wager that most of these DVDs are not bought for their interactive content, or to allow home editing into new media forms. The passive consumer-viewer is alive and well and keeps on spending.

It’s very easy to overstate the impact of new technology, especialy when you are one of the few being transformed. Most people are just not interested in writing a blog and have little reason to. It might be a disturbing form of elitism to suggest that they should, or that they are somehow being manipulated just because they don’t.

I agree there seems to be a digital divide… people at the end of the day want to be entertained the desire has been around for thousands of years, stories will always be told and passed on through media.

As i refered to in my comments on iteractive tv, most of population are happy to let others choose what they watch and consume, the same influnces seem to exsist on the web.

Blogs appeal to thoose who wish to interact allowing people to author content in the public sphere devoid of the control / influnce of traditional gate keepers.

After all, we as a society will always have the urge to escape into linear story telling after all don’t all of the most successful as in popular computer games have predefined limitations, the character, the arena, the tools choosen all have been developed by the few for the many.. even with online games, the few, (digital ellite, or game geeks) acquire the knowledge to change elements (hacks) to enhance or develope new features for the many..

Guess what i’m trying to say is that we will always be need for entertainment and escapism (Passive consumer-viewer) and there will always be the few, the storytellers ( mainly middle-class, educated), who set the narative for the many..

After all how many people in UK alone don’t even have a internet connection or have no desire to do so.

Now back to the dissy.

However, we can’t overlook the fact that many people are still ‘consumers’ of discourse in the public domain, rather than ‘producers’. ——————————————————————————-
(it is possible to quote in textile)

I think this is rapidly changing, del.icio.us is a good early example of how the average web user can create their own discourse (perhaps even without them knowing it). del.icio.us allows me to subscribe to user’s RSS feeds which is generated by them simple undertaking normally browsing habits (in this case bookmarking)

While I agree that services like del.icio.us are currently and perhaps always will be the sole domain of the techno-literate, this type folksonomy has the ability to move into the mainstream.

A simple example already in practice:

Anyone who has used Amazon has contributed to a collaborative discourse. The items you buy provide recommendations for other Amazon shoppers. This type of unconscious production of discourse makes everyone who has shopped at Amazon a producer. Tivo is one of the first ‘offline’ examples and there will be no doubt many more in the future.

The metadata we unconsciously create everyday offline and online is just waiting to be harnessed, filtered and remixed.

Archive

  • The Power of Maps (26 August 2015)
  • Gaps in the digital fossil record (5 August 2015)
  • 'feedparser.py', Kurt McKee & Mark Pilgrim (11 May 2013)
  • 'Better Stakeholder Interviews', Chris Cashdollar, Happy Cog (10 May 2013)
  • Wordpress, menus and Suhosin (28 June 2011)
  • More on storing directions for google maps (9 May 2011)
  • Profile (7 May 2011)
  • GMaps and storing directions (6 May 2011)
  • gibbetware (14 July 2010)
  • fibbitware (13 July 2010)
  • some notes on sound (24 August 2009)
  • Hauntology: Intellectual development #1 (16 June 2009)
  • hauntology (19 May 2009)
  • On Atavism and Enlightenment (10 November 2008)
  • land's end closed bridge danger - [Flickr:Places-And-Non-Places] (11 September 2008)
  • Homo Googlens (11 September 2008)
  • land's end vacant picnic tables - [Flickr:Places-And-Non-Places] (11 September 2008)
  • land's end facade - [Flickr:Places-And-Non-Places] (9 September 2008)
  • land's end private welcome - [Flickr:Places-And-Non-Places] (9 September 2008)
  • beach at night - [Flickr:Places-And-Non-Places] (24 July 2008)
  • Pixel Pier (30 May 2008)
  • housman (30 May 2008)
  • Pixel Pier: BAIMP Grad Show 08 (26 May 2008)
  • Arcade - [Flickr:Places-And-Non-Places] (20 May 2008)
  • Atrium - [Flickr:Places-And-Non-Places] (18 May 2008)
  • Seats - [Flickr:Places-And-Non-Places] (18 May 2008)
  • Places and non-places (15 May 2008)
  • Pythonesque (5 May 2008)
  • Open Flash (30 April 2008)
  • Facebook Facework (27 April 2008)
  • Pixelate the world (23 April 2008)
  • Phenomenology, positivism, and prozac (19 March 2008)
  • Hello world, my imagination (15 March 2008)
  • Community of Scholarly Practice (14 March 2008)
  • Inflexible structures (29 February 2008)
  • Flexible structures (28 February 2008)
  • Foucauldian Confession (20 February 2008)
  • The Writerly Text: Part 1 (1 February 2008)
  • Musings on Plagiarism (6 November 2007)
  • Emancipatory Power of Online Spaces (20 October 2007)
  • Splat Pedagogy (12 July 2007)
  • New Blood awards for Media School finalists (29 June 2007)
  • iheartplay: BAIMP Grad Show (6 June 2007)
  • BBC still innovative, says Highfield (16 May 2007)
  • Transmediale.07, Berlin (6 February 2007)
  • Vive la revolution! (30 January 2007)
  • Vive la Revolution (30 January 2007)
  • Biblipedia beta site (27 January 2007)
  • Fornicate with your actual genitals (27 January 2007)
  • Fornicate with your actual genitals (23 January 2007)
  • Awesome 2007 (16 January 2007)
  • Awesome 2007 (16 January 2007)
  • The Paedo-net (11 December 2006)
  • unprofessional and without redress (4 December 2006)
  • unprofessional and without redress (4 December 2006)
  • Smartlynchmobs (27 November 2006)
  • Smartlynchmobs (27 November 2006)
  • This blog will fuel a crisis in politics (20 November 2006)
  • I am in ur website, writin ur nooz (13 November 2006)
  • I am in ur website, writin ur nooz (13 November 2006)
  • myNews (30 October 2006)
  • newsTube (22 October 2006)
  • GooNews (15 October 2006)
  • GooNews (15 October 2006)
  • Satan (Democrat - Florida) (9 October 2006)
  • The CEMPle News Project (8 October 2006)
  • newsPod (2 October 2006)
  • newsPod (1 October 2006)
  • The experimental wing of political philosophy (19 May 2006)
  • Hobbes and Rousseau and Digital Media (19 May 2006)
  • We Media and the great blogging hoax (3 May 2006)
  • Don Chihuahua (30 April 2006)
  • No Fact Zone (30 April 2006)
  • Beeb and us (25 April 2006)
  • My Virtual Money (25 April 2006)
  • SOA (6 April 2006)
  • postel's law and nicotine (30 March 2006)
  • This week: Retro Contrafabulation (26 March 2006)
  • Biblipedia consultation (22 March 2006)
  • This week: The Machine Gun of Reasoned Discussion (18 March 2006)
  • This week: Noah, the Logo Weenie (3 March 2006)
  • stowaway music update (27 February 2006)
  • This week: newsr (24 February 2006)
  • This week: There's More Than One Way to Eat a News (17 February 2006)
  • Web 2.0 is the new Marxism (16 February 2006)
  • Biblipedia Vision and Scope document (12 February 2006)
  • macs, samba and XP (11 February 2006)
  • This week: reintermediate leading-edge eyeballs (10 February 2006)
  • Blog aggregator (10 February 2006)
  • Biblipedia scope (8 February 2006)
  • This week: newsCoat (3 February 2006)
  • This week: xoxbox (27 January 2006)
  • User-contributed content and quality (23 January 2006)
  • Folksonomies and collaborative organisation (23 January 2006)
  • Annotatable Audio (23 January 2006)
  • SCORM (17 December 2005)
  • Edition disambiguation (17 December 2005)
  • Plagiarism issues (17 December 2005)
  • MAG Consultation (17 December 2005)
  • COPAC (17 December 2005)
  • CathBond.com design (12 December 2005)
  • Biblipedia Protoype (10 December 2005)
  • Bibliographical data integration (4 December 2005)
  • Biblipedia project updates (4 December 2005)
  • Social bibliography tool (27 November 2005)
  • Biblipedia (19 November 2005)
  • Welcome (18 November 2005)
  • Menticulture (30 May 2005)
  • okay, so no post for 3 years (5 April 2005)
  • New Documentary Media (27 October 2004)
  • LCF Multimedia Option Exhibition 04 (28 June 2004)
  • Room (4 August 2003)
  • 3D Solar System - part II (8 July 2003)
  • LCF Multimedia Option Exhibition 03 (19 June 2003)
  • Total Theatre Workshop Company (24 May 2003)
  • Horse (21 December 2002)
  • Dancing Joe (11 October 2002)
  • The Buroughs cut technique (11 October 2002)
  • Nature Girl (5 September 2002)
  • Villainess (11 August 2002)
  • LCF Multimedia Option Exhibition 02 (27 June 2002)
  • Cleggan Bay (13 June 2002)
  • Hierarchical Menu (2 June 2002)
  • threeDworld (25 May 2002)
  • Jack and the Polar Bear (22 May 2002)
  • Lough Corrib (17 May 2002)
  • This whole website is superb, as is the article ... (30 April 2002)
  • Another prolonged absence, I'm afraid (28 April 2002)
  • Sunset (9 April 2002)
  • Tapioca Balls (8 March 2002)
  • Dunguire Boat (6 March 2002)
  • bet you didn't know that road signs are also ... (20 February 2002)
  • 3D Solar System (9 February 2002)
  • Songs For Andrew (30 December 2001)
  • Dreamweaver Tutorial (8 October 2001)
  • Why blog the events unfolding in America myself ... (13 September 2001)
  • Well thanks to the pages of The Guardian's ... (29 August 2001)
  • Very pretty pictures of space ;) (15 August 2001)
  • Very cool stuff from FFF (8 August 2001)
  • I have to say I thoroughly approve of this ;) (7 August 2001)
  • "I made you some coffee" (26 July 2001)
  • LCP - Intro to web design (10 July 2001)
  • This has got to be one of the most wonderful ... (5 July 2001)
  • What more can you ask for than a site which links ... (4 July 2001)
  • Well, now I've become a late Flash convert (23 June 2001)
  • LCF Multimedia Option Exhibition (15 June 2001)
  • Sourced from the pages of the somewhat poncey web ... (13 June 2001)
  • Fucking superb (16 May 2001)
  • Okay the fight link listed below has disappeared ... (2 May 2001)
  • Okay (30 April 2001)
  • Sites like this almost make you want to pack up ... (15 April 2001)
  • Most amusing from the halfbakery (5 April 2001)
  • This is another cute site (16 March 2001)
  • I've no idea why, but I guess it's time to ... (16 March 2001)
  • Absolutelely fascinating article by Jon Ronson ... (10 March 2001)
  • Very, very groovy site playing with Shockwave toys (16 February 2001)
  • From Gilbert and George's site (16 February 2001)
  • Well hello February (16 February 2001)
  • This is a cute site with early photos capturing ... (8 February 2001)
  • Okay (5 January 2001)
  • Mmmm (14 December 2000)
  • "This is ridiculous" ... (14 December 2000)
  • Okay, suffice to say I bottled my prank at the end ... (11 December 2000)
  • Incidentally, this is the unspeakably shite ... (10 December 2000)
  • Ahh, Sunday afternoons (10 December 2000)
  • The new release of Netscape 6 is so much better ... (7 December 2000)
  • new life on Mars ... (7 December 2000)
  • Time for some geek links (7 December 2000)
  • Now this is a stowaway kind of site (30 November 2000)
  • This is where I work (30 November 2000)
  • EEEuuuuwwwrrrgggghhh (29 November 2000)
  • My absence has been due to my uncle Fred dying (28 November 2000)
  • Actually, the tribune page below is only cool in ... (28 November 2000)
  • Okay I have to agree with tom@plasticbag (23 November 2000)
  • An old joke but a good one, Ben (22 November 2000)
  • hey its turning into a good day for homepages (20 November 2000)
  • Absolutely superb website (20 November 2000)
  • And while I'm on it, wasn't 4AD the best ... (19 November 2000)
  • Recently rediscovered Throwing Muses after leaving ... (19 November 2000)
  • Went to see Simon Russell Beale in Hamlet at the ... (19 November 2000)
  • Many thanks to Peter who brought Untitled Document ... (17 November 2000)
  • It's been a good 24 hours for amazing natural ... (16 November 2000)
  • Oh God I'm disappearing under a mountain of ... (14 November 2000)
  • Now, I'm not a war kind of person (11 November 2000)
  • Laugh? I nearly lost it at a site I found while ... (10 November 2000)
  • Good grief ... (10 November 2000)
  • it has to be /usr/bin/girl that gets the ... (4 November 2000)
  • ok, so now i've got the damn thing running (4 November 2000)
  • So, if you're wondering how (31 October 2000)
  • Huzzah!! The next / previous tags are working!!! (31 October 2000)
  • Oh, and if you're still looking at ~/index (27 October 2000)
  • Okay, so this is number 13, and we're only ... (27 October 2000)
  • ummm (27 October 2000)
  • Now, this is number eleven (23 October 2000)
  • Okay, this is entry 10 (23 October 2000)
  • etc (23 October 2000)
  • This, of course, will be entry number 5 (23 October 2000)
  • This is entry four in the stowaway blog database (23 October 2000)
  • This is entry three in the stowaway blog database (13 October 2000)
  • This is entry two in the stowaway blog database (13 October 2000)
  • This is entry one in the stowaway blog database (13 October 2000)
  • Small Print

    Joe Flintham 2000 - 2015

    Long form: Menticulture

    Professional Services: Fathom Point